Here’s why we’re getting to a point where ‘political correctness is dead’

“Political correctness is dying,” the new slogan that will be popping up everywhere in the wake of Donald Trump’s presidential victory.

The word, coined by Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders and adopted by his campaign and the American Civil Liberties Union, has become a meme of sorts for progressives and their allies, who use it to denounce the supposed threat of “political correctness” and the way in which it’s used by Trump supporters.

The new slogan is intended to reflect the anger of millions of Americans who say they’ve been harassed, discriminated against, and marginalized by the new president and his administration.

In a tweet, Sanders used the hashtag #NotMyPresident to call for the impeachment of the president.

And, as he did in his speech on the Senate floor on Thursday, Sanders pledged to “do everything in my power to end the violence, the hate, the fear and the racism that is being unleashed by this administration.”

The campaign also launched a campaign on social media to demand a “No Platform” from Trump supporters and the release of the videos of Trump supporters chanting “Get out of my country” and “Lock her up.”

The hashtag “No platform” is also being used as a rallying cry by protesters across the country, as well as by the civil rights organizations.

The hashtag is the latest move by progressives to highlight the ways in which they have been marginalized by Trump.

The phrase “political censorship” was used in the 1960s by Martin Luther King Jr. to highlight that the government could not and would not protect the right of speech without the protection of the First Amendment.

This was a rallying call for civil rights leaders in the 1970s and ’80s.

This is not the first time that “political speech” has been used as an rallying cry.

In February, the New York Times reported that the Department of Justice and other federal agencies were using “political propaganda” as a tool to combat the influence of the Trump administration.

And a former federal judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in Washington, D.C., who previously worked on the Civil Rights Division of the Department, wrote in a Washington Post op-ed on the matter that the Trump White House has “used the power of political speech to silence critics and silence dissent.”

The Trump administration’s actions and rhetoric have led to the creation of a “blacklist” of some critics and their supporters, including some members of the LGBTQ community, according to the Washington Post.

Trump has been a strong supporter of the Ku Klux Klan and the Kuwagwa Nation, which has been at the center of the protests that began in Charlottesville, Virginia, last August, the Washington Examiner reported.

The Trump presidency has been marked by violence, discrimination, and racial inequality, as evidenced by the deadly shooting of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and the death of Heather Heyer in Charlottesville.

“It is time to do something about this violence,” Sanders said in his victory speech.

Sanders, who will be joining his Senate colleague Kamala Harris, a California Democrat, at a campaign rally in San Francisco on Saturday, is calling for a full investigation into the shooting of Heyer, and “a fair investigation.””

If you’re out there on the streets of this country, you have a responsibility to speak out against this hatred and to demand justice.”

Sanders, who will be joining his Senate colleague Kamala Harris, a California Democrat, at a campaign rally in San Francisco on Saturday, is calling for a full investigation into the shooting of Heyer, and “a fair investigation.”